Justin Moodie

Digital veteran living in London.

Most of these photos are my own, unless otherwise credited.

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  1. Aiguille du Midi by Moonlight, Chamonix-Mont Blanc by JustinMoodie.

    Aiguille du Midi by Moonlight, Chamonix-Mont Blanc by JustinMoodie.

     
  2. Chamonix-Mont Blanc by Night. JustinMoodie.

    Chamonix-Mont Blanc by Night. JustinMoodie.

     
  3. Chamonix-Mont Blanc in the Moonlight. JustinMoodie.

    Chamonix-Mont Blanc in the Moonlight. JustinMoodie.

     
  4. London County Council, London. (JustinMoodie)

    London County Council, London. (JustinMoodie)

     
  5. Big Ben, London. (JustinMoodie)

    Big Ben, London. (JustinMoodie)

     
  6. London Eye, London. (JustinMoodie)

    London Eye, London. (JustinMoodie)

     
  7. Even the toilet is sad today.

    Even the toilet is sad today.

     
  8. theatlantic:

Life Before (and After) Page Numbers

Print media evolved into its present forms. 
In, say, 1469, there were no page numbers. This obvious and now necessary part of the book’s user interface simply did not exist. 
The earliest extant example of sequential numbering in a book (this time of ‘leaves’ rather than pages, per se) is the document you see at the top of this page, Sermo in festo praesentationis beatissimae Mariae virginis, which was printed in Cologne in 1470. The practice didn’t become standard, the wonderful I Love Typography tells us, for another half century. 
The page number is particularly interesting, I think, because it is a pointer, a kind of metadata that breaks apart a work into constituent parts. The existence of page numbers creates a set of miniature sub-publications to which someone can refer.
Read more. [Image: Heinrich Heine Universität Düsseldorf]


The evolution of the user experience of the printed page.

    theatlantic:

    Life Before (and After) Page Numbers

    Print media evolved into its present forms. 

    In, say, 1469, there were no page numbers. This obvious and now necessary part of the book’s user interface simply did not exist. 

    The earliest extant example of sequential numbering in a book (this time of ‘leaves’ rather than pages, per se) is the document you see at the top of this page, Sermo in festo praesentationis beatissimae Mariae virginis, which was printed in Cologne in 1470. The practice didn’t become standard, the wonderful I Love Typography tells us, for another half century. 

    The page number is particularly interesting, I think, because it is a pointer, a kind of metadata that breaks apart a work into constituent parts. The existence of page numbers creates a set of miniature sub-publications to which someone can refer.

    Read more. [Image: Heinrich Heine Universität Düsseldorf]

    The evolution of the user experience of the printed page.

     
  9. A car, unbelievably, hanging off the back of a truck held on, more unbelievably, by its side mirrors.

    You see this kind of nonsense on YouTube but you don’t expect to see it in London.

    thinking about this more, how the hell did the car even get on the truck? And why?
     
     car  truck  insane  London 
     
  10. Economy class in the 1960s. Awesome. (via Gizmodo)

    Economy class in the 1960s. Awesome. (via Gizmodo)

     
  11. Winter Moon, Clerkenwell (by JustinMoodie)

    Winter Moon, Clerkenwell (by JustinMoodie)

     
  12. Colihuacho, Valdivia de Chile (by JustinMoodie)

    Colihuacho, Valdivia de Chile (by JustinMoodie)

     
  13. Colihuacho, Valdivia de Chile (by JustinMoodie)

    Colihuacho, Valdivia de Chile (by JustinMoodie)

     
  14. Javier getting last-minute advice before braving the sea lions and waves in Curiñanco, Chile (by JustinMoodie)

    Javier getting last-minute advice before braving the sea lions and waves in Curiñanco, Chile (by JustinMoodie)

     
  15. Flowers, Valdivia de Chile (by JustinMoodie)

    Flowers, Valdivia de Chile (by JustinMoodie)